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Tuesday, June 27 2017

Huckleberry Finn's Father Illustrates What's Behind the Tea Party Movement

Politic

 

Oh, heck, I just finished writing a wonderful article.  I referenced "The Wave", in which a teacher illustrates how Nazi's "allowed the Holocaust to happen", through cruel performance art...eventually revealing to his students that they, too, would have followed Adolf Hitler, and sent their neighbors to the death camps.

And then I suggested that Huckleberry Finn's father:Tea Party  :: Adolf Hitler:pupils in "The Wave" .

And then the website ate it.  And no, I'm not going to rebuild the whole thing.  But lemme give you the highlights:

 

Huckleberry Finn's father is righteous, upset, and abused by the government:

"Call this a govment! why, just look at it and see what it's like. Here's the law a-standing ready to take a man's son away from him — a man's own son, which he has had all the trouble and all the anxiety and all the expense of raising. Yes, just as that man has got that son raised at last, and ready to go to work and do suthin' for him and give him a rest, the law up and goes for him. And they call that govment! That ain't all, nuther. The law backs that old Judge Thatcher up and helps him to keep me out o' my property. Here's what the law does: The law takes a man worth six thousand dollars and up'ards, and jams him into an old trap of a cabin like this, and lets him go round in clothes that ain't fitten for a hog. They call that govment! A man can't get his rights in a govment like this. Sometimes I've a mighty notion to just leave the country for good and all. Yes, and I told 'em so; I told old Thatcher so to his face. Lots of 'em heard me, and can tell what I said. Says I, for two cents I'd leave the blamed country and never come a-near it ag'in. Them's the very words. I says, look at my hat — if you call it a hat — but the lid raises up and the rest of it goes down till it's below my chin, and then it ain't rightly a hat at all, but more like my head was shoved up through a jint o' stovepipe. Look at it, says I — such a hat for me to wear — one of the wealthiest men in this town if I could git my rights. "

Hey, so's the Tea Party Movement!

Elder Finn is more overt than the Tea Partiers, with his racist opposition to ex-professor mulatto's who think they're better than he is:

"Oh, yes, this is a wonderful govment, wonderful. Why, looky here. There was a free nigger there from Ohio — a mulatter, most as white as a white man. He had the whitest shirt on you ever see, too, and the shiniest hat; and there ain't a man in that town that's got as fine clothes as what he had; and he had a gold watch and chain, and a silver-headed cane — the awfulest old gray-headed nabob in the state. And what do you think? They said he was a p'fessor in a college, and could talk all kinds of languages, and knowed everything. And that ain't the wust. They said he could vote when he was at home. Well, that let me out. Thinks I, what is the country a-coming to? It was 'lection day, and I was just about to go and vote myself if I warn't too drunk to get there; but when they told me there was a state in that country where they'd let that nigger vote, I drawed out. I says I'll never vote ag'in. Them's the very words I said; they all heard me; and the country may rot for all me — I'll never vote ag'in as long as I live. And to see the cool way of that nigger — why, he wouldn't 'a' give me the road if I hadn't shoved him out o' the way. I says to the people, why ain't this nigger put up at auction and sold? — that's what I want to know. And what do you reckon they said? Why, they said he couldn't be sold till he'd been in the state six months, and he hadn't been there that long yet. There, now — that's a specimen. They call that a govment that can't sell a free nigger till he's been in the state six months. Here's a govment that calls itself a govment, and lets on to be a govment, and thinks it is a govment, and yet's got to set stock-still for six whole months before it can take a-hold of a prowling, thieving, infernal, white-shirted free nigger, and —"

Huckelberry Finn's father is absolutely right, that he's been maltreated, and that the government is abusing him.  And he's more honest about his racism (given that Tea Partiers didn't say anything during GWB's term as President, yet many of them are "birthers").  Of course, he selectively leavs out key bits of information.

So does the Tea Party.

They oppose socialism in all its forms.  But don't take away their national infrastructure, national security, social security, etc.  Just make sure people worse off than me don't have guaranteed health insurance.

They are in favor of lower taxes (regardless of what their tax rate currently is), but at the same time as they want less revenue generated, and they don't want programs cut, they want a magically balanced budget.

They oppose greedy unions, but assume that currently bargained-for workers will still be major consumers even with less income.


 

(I was more clever, bordering on subtlety, the first time I wrote it.)  Tea Partiers:  Meet your leader...Huckleberry Finn's father.

 

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Huckleberry Finn\'s Father Illustrates What\'s Behind the Tea Party Movement
Authored by: Anonymous onSunday, June 11 2017
I really liked the book, Huckleberry Finn as it was a definite classic. There are 5 Killer Tactics to Boost Your Blog Visibility and one of those was the mentalities his father had employed. I've been feeling that this book had a huge impact on a lot of different people.